What is tramadol and what’s it used for?

Tramadol could be a synthetic (man-made) pain reliever (analgesic). What is tramadol and what’s it used for? Researchers and doctors don’t know the precise mechanism of action of tramadol, but it’s almost like morphine. Like morphine, tramadol binds to receptors within the brain (narcotic or opioid receptors) that are important for transmitting the feeling of pain from throughout the body to the brain.

Like other narcotics wont to treat pain, patients taking tramadol may abuse the drug and become passionate about it.

Tramadol isn’t an NSAID drug (NSAID), therefore, it doesn’t have the increased risk of stomach ulcers and internal bleeding that may occur with NSAIDs.

Doctors prescribe tramadol to manage moderate to moderately severe pain. Extended-release tablets are used for moderate to moderately severe chronic pain in adults who require continuous treatment for an extended period.

Tramadol shouldn’t be accustomed treat pain in children younger than 12 years old, and it shouldn’t be accustomed to treat pain after surgery to get rid of the tonsils and/or adenoids in children younger than 18 years old. Children between 12 and 18 years old who are overweight or have breathing problems like obstructive apnea or severe lung disease shouldn’t receive tramadol.

What are the side effects of tramadol?

Tramadol is mostly well-tolerated, and side effects are usually temporary.

Commonly reported side effects of tramadol to include:

nausea,

constipation,

dizziness,

headache,

euphoria,

indigestion,

spasticity,

weakness,

drowsiness, and

vomiting.

Less commonly reported side effects to include:

itching,

sweating,

dry mouth,

diarrhea,

rash,

visual disturbances, and

vertigo.

Some patients who received tramadol have reported seizures. it’s going to cause serotonin syndrome when combined with other drugs that also increase serotonin (see drug interactions section).

Is tramadol a narcotic? Is it addictive?

Tramadol may be a narcotic and is addictive. It could be a Schedule IV drug that has been related to addiction, abuse, and misuse. It could also be addictive, even at the dosage, your doctor has prescribed. Abuse or misuse of tramadol can result in overdose and death.

Like other opioids, those who take tramadol for an extended time will develop withdrawal symptoms if your doctor reduces the dosage, or if you suddenly stop taking tramadol.

Withdrawal symptoms that will occur include:

Restlessness

Excessive tear production

Yawning

Sweating

Chills

Muscle pain

Anxiety

Backache

Joint pain

Weakness

Abdominal cramps

Insomnia

Nausea

Weight loss

Vomiting

Diarrhea

Increased force per unit area

Respiratory rate

Heart rate

Infants born to mothers who were taking tramadol during the pregnancy will develop symptoms of withdrawal and difficulty breathing.

How does tramadol compare with other pain management drugs?

To review how tramadol compares to other pain medications, please seek advice from this information.

Tramadol vs. Oxycodone

Depression

Tramadol vs. Hydrocodone

Tramadol vs. Vicodin

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